Build, Grow, Feed
Craft Food Classroom
Craft Food Classroom

Episode · 5 months ago

Build, Grow, Feed

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Eric Diamond and co-host David Miller sit down with Walter Bonham of The Food Lab. He talks about his mission to get good food into his community. To meet this mission, he helps establish urban farms, build hoop houses and other structures to promote sustainable food production.

"My motto is to 'Build, Grow, Feed.'"

Also, sitting down in this episode is Korinna Goettel, the executive director of IdeaWorks, a shared-use kitchen and co-working space. She is also the founder and producer of Figg’s beverages, including Figg’s Cocktail mixes.

http://eatthefoodlab.com/our-story/
www.TheCentral.Kitchen
www.PNC.com
@ediblecleveland
@centralkitcle
@craftfoodclassroom
@figgs_mixers

A welcome to the craft food classroompodcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage ofgrowth brought to you by P, NC Bank andcentral kitchen media, and now here's your host Eric Diamond. This is Eric Divento, the centalkitchen, bringing you the next episode of the craft food classroom, thepodcast. I am super excited today, because my co host is none other thande money millionaire. Is it biller back in the building back in the buildingman? It's been a minute. It had S, and this is such a much better platform.It's so much more relevant to what we're doing right. Craft food classroomis up and running and we're all slated to knock it out. The park this year,hopefully give me give me a little plug and craft food classroom, yeah, so thecraft food classroom. We offer an online class that runs five weeks. It'sall things: food we go from week, one we talk about your life plan. Why doyou even want to be in the food arena anyway? What are some of the obstaclesand hurdles? And then how dedicated and discipline are you and then in week towe talk about what's in your product, which that begins to really bring ithome for a lot of entrepreneurs, because that's what they're there? Forso everybody wants to talk about their product or what they do in the foodarena. And then, after that, we talk about marketing and media and brandingand in the next week, is financials with you yeah. So all the money thatgoes into the business where's it going. Why is it going there? How are youtracking it and then, after that, the fifth week is what we consider prettymuch the rapit week and we talk about distribution wholesale retail. So onceyou go through the craft food classroom, you have five weeks of just reallyintensive training on certain topics and a lot of the folks that finish andwrap up feel really well prepared to. You know, hit the ground running rightwell right or they can find that on our...

...website, right yeah, you could go tothe central kitchen website. You can get links to the craft food classroomfrom there cool awesome. So David we've got two friends here today fromrichland grow up. Why don't you introduce our first guest yeah, so wehave walt who come to us from the riginal Grow Up Walt? Is a farmer outthere actually we're going to set the stage and let walt tell us a little bitabout himself, because I can't do it like him and plus he has a uniquebackground, so we'll let walt talk, tell us a little bit wall about whatyou do at Richland and how you got into farming in the first place right. Butthank you. Thank you guys for having me down here. My name is Walter Bonum. Iam the operator and creator of the food lap and I am one small business made upof nine businesses total they represent the richland grow up, which is acooperative, a farming, cooperative and Mans for Toho, and we service onRichmond County. We were present richland county as a hole, that's cool.So how did you get into it? Well, I got in pretty much the same way thatthe other other eight members got in involved with. We all had differentpassions for growing food and kind of like in our own silo share. So mepersonally, I just will a lot of my journey. Just came around me want tomake changes of my own personal life. You want big changes in my family'slife around what they were eating, what they were doing my mate. My business isto bill grow feed. So I had a girl aspect in a farmer aspect that I wantedto do in my business sure, and then, when is when the project came aboutthat that we are collected to the micro farm project, that's where we are kindof collectively kind of heard about this opportunity to growing farm, andwe all had similar interest in to farm in and jumped on board. How long agowas that that was about we're going into our third year wow right now, soso a little over two years ago I was just a concept that was kind of beingthought about. We put it on paper and then now we got buildings up and we'reactually we're actually official business now, and we have somecustomers now and we're starting to serve produce now excellent. So wheredid the love of farming come from?...

Really? It is really like. I was kindof importing my life personally. Where is one to make? Some changes wasn'treally happy with my health, my body and things like that. So I just want itwasn't something you grew up around. No, I did not grow up O, I didn't know Ididn't have did not have a background and a farm in my background personally,is in business and managing things. Work for a bunch of companies andmanageable employees done about to do different things for years, and itturned into me this wanted to make some personal decisions to do better andfind places that I could work for that were more fulfilling to me sure youknow I'm kind of going about that journey and also had an entrepreneurspirit too. So a lot of kind of start coming out. So how do you teachyourself to farm? I know. That's yeah, yeah, you know what I tell you like.You know it's a journey. That's one of the coolest things about our cooperative is that all of us started out doing something different. We had a fewpeople that were kind of growers and things, but nobody we was reallyfarming. So everybody had a different background. So would really help mewith the process was the training that was offered ind a micro farm project.We are trained for about a year, plus, oh, very cool, and so that wasliterally. Allow me to kind of start understanding crop start just kind ofgetting a feel for w what it was like to farm that summer too, when we firststarted training I have volunteered on the farm to as well local form, and soyeah just came from a love of me. This training getting involved and just givemy hands ter. Do it a we who who allowed you guys to do the training?Was that ran through a program yeah, so the microphone project was actually agrant that we got through FFAR, okay and it was in conjunction with Ohiostate in a necis in some or our community partners, necistate CommunityImprovement Collaborative Gotcha. They actually host my farm and anothermember of ince, Owens farm actually on their Tella Er site in location, that'scool, so it was all kind of a big project that came together and the theway the grant worked was we had it was it was a matching million dollar grantwow, so we were able to come up with half a million dollars and match andthen a half million dollars in...

...financial match. Oh Wow be able tomatch that million bucks and a part of it was in the kitchen what you're goingto meet Corean a little later here. But a bunch of it was like a lot ofcommunity support coming on board to match that incline and allowing us tosee the vision of what we were trying to do and create, and we end up gettinga grant and then two million dollars later spread across the board. I'm toToloo great in our project is a lot of research. So I the research around theeffects of what's going on with the farmers, the community, how we'reimpacting the laning things were growing on. It's just many aspectsaround what the project is all about business. It goes beyond the food rightnow, that's good, so n, a O and, of course, Os Coreean, the cooperative. Sowe ala formed a business through this whole process. That's cool! So whatkind of things do you grow? Well, man, as a cooperative, we grow tons ofdifferent things on right now, the way we're set up. We have a marketer thattells us what the grown Gotcha so that kind of takes a lot of the guessing outof it for tat, he's able to kind of pre, sell different things and talk todifferent customers and kind of figure out what we need to grow, but currentlyright now we're growing. A few different types of lettuce were growingturnips right now, righter growing spinach right now we just kind of cameinto our our early spring seizure, so now we'retrying to transition into the summer as well. So people have gotten tomatoes inthe ground now we're getting peppers in the ground now and things like that andgetting our outside bats going to so who's. Your add consumer of the product.Right now we sell to a few different food hops ELCO, which is really kind ofcool. Also we are our biggest customers right now, our food hops it in some ofour local restaurants, wear like that. We've been able to grow what they needexactly in their restaurants and keep them from traveling to get produce fromdifferent small markets, an Asian markets and things like that or evenordering stuff from California e. not they can get. You know right down thestreet from us. Now we like local, nothing like local. So under yourinitiative is there, are we seeing more...

...minorities, take part in the in thefarming part or are you? Are you seeing that happening at Richland, wherethere's more minority interest in farming or no well is actually a coolconcept? Our cooperative is made up of the nine members. Four of them areurban and then a five and five of them are rule. So we do see a lot ofinterest and especially in our urban site, now, because there's eight hightunnels on this twelve Hicker site and there's like outsides, raise bids a tonof stuff going on. We also host a farmer's market there too, and thingslike that. So now we are starting to see a lot of interests from folks who,who who have never thought about farming or growing food right cool yeah.So where do you see yourself going with this? Well Man, I mean as a whole. I see thecooperative really looking into doing things even outside of our produce sokind of growing our brand in our business by right now we're connectedwith the school aseity schools. Now do so we will be we'll have kids involved. Fourth, through sixgrade learning about agriculture and also helping get involved in kids, gettingcollege create low starting seven grade through high school and allowed them toactually come out of high school with college credit that can go towards toact degree in different things like that, like they do with like nursing,you see those con yeah, so we've been able, because of our project andinitiative that we're doing we've been able to you know, tie in differentthings like that in our high school in our middle school begin high tunnels tosummer, we have initiative to try to get involved with selling food insideof the school right now we're trying to were working with other people to we'regetting our food in our local hospitals wow. Now to and things like that aswell, that's a man! You guys got it so yeah we're just trying to expand. Youknow different ways and just trying to just you know, selling the produce andjust trying to figure out different ways that our brand and our in foodawareness can affect our community. That's super cool, so walk me throughthis real quick. Well, if to our...

...listeners, people who may be no pun intended, but a little green tothe whole growing of vegetables and stuff, can you grow all year round?Yeah? We actually can here now, because we that's part of us being microfarmers. We all have high tunnels, okay on right now, so we all have smallplots that we kind of take on and we collectively harvest together to try tobe able to sell as a whole room. So we don't. One farmer doesn't have to takeon trying to grow so much individually, yeah but be yeah so like in the wintertime we just we just plant winter crops that can really take it. So we do likedifferent now, spinach and carrots switch chart. You know beats anddifferent things like that under the high tunnels, you don't have to worryabout and they will continue to grow slowly through the winter, but thencome springtime, they'll be ready to harvest. That's that's sweet! We hadsome of their products in love, local basket. We did we did. We got a connection with the microGreens. I think it was was end of last summer, a it was some of you guys gotsome of the different Greens that we had, and actually my spinach made it toa very like my winter spinach that I actually grew. I made it to you guys,the best guy in here that's a small small world that is a small world, sowe are going to take a quick break here from our sponsor PAC bank. When we comeback, I want to try some of this lettuce. Perfect. We get to crunch onthe MICA and the big bill. We pay some bills, so we will be back ther DiamondDavid Miller with the craft food classroom, the podcast. This podcast is brought to you by PansBank. For more than a hundred and sixty years we've been committed to providingour clients with great service and powerful financial expertise to helpthem meet their financial goals. We are proud of our long standing history ofsupporting not only our customers, but our community employees andshareholders for more information on Pancake, please visit WPG. This is Erican David. We are back withthe craft food classroom. The podcast...

...has everyone feeling feeling goodfeeling feeling really good feeling better. Now that I see some freshproduce in front of me yeah, so why why don't you walk is through what youbought up today for us to try yeah about just a few different things thatare in season for us here right now, life o Spring Mixes Lettuce. We havesome skellings here we have a MAZOUNA, Asan Mix, slow variety of Greens wehave some spinach did me, have some a red spinach as well some and switchcharge, and then also we have some of French radishes and then some Easter, aradishes all right LE. So what the purple ones are, what those are Easter,Easter, all right, sweet- and I a grab some of disrate this right here- thatI'm grased relief, spinach right there awesome incredible hall, mths stuff looks wonderful t sbeautiful, I'm munching on the Mike! THAT'S DELICIOUS S! radishes in that that's been is inparticular, we grow for a restaurant, a local restaurant in Mansfield. Theseare much sweeter. radishes than you'retypically used to yeah yeah people, like the radishes, get a bad name. Yeahright is a delicious yeah. They do radishes do get a pat you like readersize. I do yeah. I do. I made a mistake, quick story. I like radishes, I likemessing around with them, and we had so many dicon radishes and love localofferings that decided to take some and cut them up and mix them with somepotatoes that I did on the grill. The concept was just to kind of see howthey cook up and see you now, if I can incorporate some fresh radish into mykids diet without them, knowing Ri big mistake but yeah, because you cut thepotatoes up and they cook up really good with the butter and onion. Butthese things they don't fry up Y, A K O and they get real soggy, and so it was.The kids were really like. What is this? The wee stuff? In my food I was likethat's a radish and I got a scare them away from them like we got nothing. No,no love for that. There's no way. How do so advise me? How do you make thiskid friendly? Well, you know what...

...you can. You can sneak radishes andturnips into mashed potatoes, a right yeah, so you were on the right trackthere as hemp make em in there on them andyeah. They won't. Even they won't even be able to to that's good on the back and it has a little spiceit does. I, like it a lot wonderful stuff. So this is only your third yearof growing yeah. Actually we just complete. So we went through a yearplus of training kind of an we just completed. Our kind of first year wererolling into our. You know kind of second season at that's awesome, and soare you feeling better about where you're, at with your knowledge base andwhat you're doing with the and you know what there are there's so many things Ilearn about growing food and I think, like all of us, are our cooperative. Wehad to kind of the write intention on what we were doing and things, butnobody probably could really understand until you kind of get involved with itand you do it the learning curve and what it actually really takes andeverything you have to kind of worry about in the former world. But it'sbeen beneficial and we've been learning a lot. We learned a Lott of the lastfew years, but there's tons of more to learn. Are you? Are you continue totrain or it now? Is it just kind of like you? You do it with thecooperative. You guys go through stuff together collectively, or is there somekind of unified training or continuing education around farming that you getare more a more formal training is over, but we do have different extensionprofessors that we can reach out to in different things now. So I woulddefinitely say we all are still in training and we all are still pickingup new crops like these Asian Greens that I got over here. This is my firstyear, first time growing, those, but then, as far as spinach, though I'vegrown spinach three times now, one three three different seasons now: Okayto different parts of the season, but so you know some things I'm gettingfamiliar with, while new things are just coming coming on board to at thesame time, this either for all of us. Okay, do you guys do Color Greens? Youknow what yes, yes, actually we do have calores growing right now at the urbanfarm right, the CI urban farm, and also we just sold a bunch of mustard. So wejust clear a ton of of some of mustard green to it at some of the colors. Whatdo you like growing? What's your...

...personal favorite man, you know what Oh Gosh I grown. I grow some stuff withthe corporate and it actually had the opportunity working with one of our oneof our farmers in me, Marko too gross some things at her house last year thatwe weren't required to grow I'm through the cooperative. So in my in my growingexperience, I wrote a lot of fun going watermillons Welee, grown melons andKempes, and things like that they're not as easy as you would think, grownthe melt. They were easier actually really like you know they require a lot:less maintenance, okay, it so look to maintenance, low disease pressure, lowbug pressure. You know those things if you can keep keep the animals away fromright, but yeasty were a little bit easier andthey kind of you know the vine out. They do their own thing and things likethat, so I o O on growing melons and as far as the the different things I'vegrown for the cooperative, these asen Greens and Growny diferent Greens, Ithink are- are pretty cool. He he, the pretty cool to it, they're prettylittle manage, but you know I do like the variety and the color and thingsthat the way to look in the tunnels, it's cool, pretty easy to. That is cool.I guess, do you guys do Pumpkins at all ever? No! No! No! No! We haven't grownanything like that. Yet we really pretty much have stayed into the inchof things that we know we can sell for sure. There's been talk, a kind ofexperiment and doing different things. I know some of our other farmers havegrown Difetti like I was saying, grown, different things outside of thecorporate, but as far as selling, so in Pumpkins and things that we haven't, wehaven't reached out and last thing for me: you guys do fruits not reallycurrently an right. Now it's been it's been in the talks. Fruit is a littlebit different process, especially in Ohio. If you don't talk about doing anytrees or doing a berry, bushes and things like that to in those in takesmeme years yea. There are some talks me about some strawberries or differentthings, but but again it's just been thus really just been focused on withthe market once a Gamin tead of us just growing and then trying to create amarket or taking chances of not selling things, it's smart, smart. What you'redoing so smart, we talk as David and I...

...as entrepreneurs an we're talking withentrepreneurs. We always ask him what your unfair advantages. What are youbetter at than anybody else as you've been on through this business journey?I think that a huge advantage that we have as a CO operative is that nobodywas growing food. He really in this in our area really yeah in the way that wewere to try to market the way that we were in so one. So, if you think, ifyou think about it, you know we knew for a fact that, like millions ofdollars worth of produce, Oh sales were leaving mantell like every year yeah,and it's like you know why? Don't we try to capture some of this, like I canroll at this right right, like we know like people are buying Latis, so can I,like you know, can I grow a little bit of your letters for you right here samething, you know with some of these major crops and then also some of thethings we start finding out that inch that you know people are ordering stuff.I can't get a hold of stuff. I'm like you know I can go the right. You knowwe can try to. We can try to go that for you and things too. So I thinkthat's really a niche that we had is that you know people weren't reallyfocused on trying to grow the way we were in our area. We have a lot of Soyncoring going on and we have some some farmers in the area and things, butthey were neer not as focused as we were collectively when trying to attackthe marketing things that we do in another avantages as been a cooperativeyeah right right. So, if I was, you know Walter Ba'm trying to do this, youknow my own and knocking on all these restaurant on doors and so on andthings you know. I wouldn't be able to really be at his thing in the way, aswe can as a whole whole a youee sell our farmers barket. No, we as acooperative, we don't, I don't sell it at a farmer's market, but some of othercooperate. Members do Katcha and- and I think, a few more cooperate. Membersare probably going to look into maybe trying at this year or even the onesthat that did tell a farmers market last year will be, but I will say thatwe do host a farmers market at the necis urban farm, starting in Juneevery Thursday awesome. So we have a local market. That's right! On the farm,Oh cool! What time do you guys have that yeah, I believe start at four fromis thinking. I think that that we're going to do it forward to seven if fominutes taking excellent, well cool three, seven, a d forty something year.Well, this has been awesome. It has been awesome. Ye have the last question.I do okay, I want to and I'm I sure,...

...you're probably going to get to it, butI'm a Cuttin line. Can you tell our listeners where they can find you guysand your website? Definitely definitely you guys want to go to a rich Lan growup in as DRO HYPHEN OP Okayama. We just updated our website to so a bunch ofcool information on there as well, and then to learn more about the urban farm.You can go to necis Dash Ohio, do work and then you can find out a little bitabout some of the other urban farmers and things that we have where myfarmers locate awesome. That's so cool thanks again, while from coming outtoday and bringing us some of these awesome produces that you created I'mso impressed and jealous of he looked at out of his talent, and I don't havethat talent yeah. I will thank you so much. We are think you I a pleasurethanks. Well here. This is arid Dimanda, David Miller,bringing you the craft food classroom, the podcast. We are back David, how youfeeling I am feeling better than ever really yeah better than ever. Yeah Yeah,I'm back and better than ever is the best day of my life. All right. Why don't you go ahead and tell us whowe got talking to that, so unbelievable? The fact that we're live again today,such a raggedy drive in all I saw, was rain and tail lights. That's all I saidis missed until like so to make it it's a great day, I'm happy to be alive, andwe have a great guess with this. Today we have Korea, gettle right and said itright and Karen, as the executive director of idea, works right, that'scorrect! Yeah. Can you tell us a little bit about idea works so idea? Works islocated in in Mansfeld Ohio. We are a shared use, kitchen and also a coworking space, very cool cool- and you also are an entrepreneur. Is that right?I am yeah by accident yeah. Let's talk about that story, because it'sinteresting how it all kind of connects right. So you started off as anentrepreneur and what is your product,...

...so I make an Apple Pie, apple side orbase cocktail mix called called figs. Figs. Liquid innovations is the name ofthe company we have some here today. We are getting ready to sample. Absolutely.Is that like? Is it like a Shrub? Now it's not okay. It's not! You know whatit's really based on is the Apple Pie, moonshine yeah, so it's based on that.Just imagine. Taking the alcohol up interest, so do you recommend it withalcohol? The absolute okay? All right, then that's the this kind ofshow I'm talking about! Ah, that's that's the best place to start.Obviously people use it for other re. We have. I have a sweet heat flavor. Ididn't bring with me because I didn't have any a lot of people use that formarinating their pork to before they so very cool wait hold on. You got a sweetheat that you met with this, like a sweet heat, that's its own flavor, soit's got a little burn to it. So I took the Apple Pie, the original flagship,flavor and added some helpin okay. So it's got a little burn. Yeah! No,that's cool! So you said it was by accident. How did that happen? So I'd been making apple pie main shinejust for the FAM sure putting in in the bases, Sitar Story Masai, and we were thinking about. You know wecould take the alcohol out of this and just make it into a mixer. Why isn'tanybody doing this because to make apple pie? maintry takes a lot of youknow the ingredients, not a lot of ingredients, but it cider and sureusually made it a great big, huge batches, so it took a while, and I hada job at the time that we had that idea that and then I surely thereafter didnot have a job woa yeah. So I was like well. This would be a great time tokick this product off, so we did so that's where the accidental comes in sodid you find the kitchen and start producing there, or so we didn't findthe kitchen that that I'm using now, we are actually using like a lot of peoplewho need a certified ODA, a High Department of Agriculture, approvedkitchen or location. We started bottling in a bar real, did it yet theyweren't using their kitchen anymore. It was just a bar. I was a week mostly aweekend Mar Gotcha, and so we were...

...bottling there, and then we made a we.I think they sold it or whatever we needed to look for a new location. Sowe had a couple of different other locations where we bottled. I ended upfinding the kitchen that I managed now started bottling there in December oftwo thousand and sixteen and then like early and Jane Veri got an email fromfrom the founder of the company. Say We don't have a manager anymore. Could yourun the kitchen forest until we figure out what we want to do with it? Oh so,from there I took on it became a good thing. The company kept growing, so thedecided to keep it in operation, and I took over his and director as adirector of just the kitchen and then just last year took over executivedirector of I get work, oh very cool, so the kitchen is named what iscurrently nade entrepreneurs kitchen on to Gers Cote when we went from, we wentfrom being a four profit to a non profit under idea, works, okay, we'rein the middle of transitioning to idea works kitchen. Oh, I do work scorsothat will keep you knoww name name brand or the brand identification whostarted in win. So it started in two thousand andsixteen grammer of Wo Thousand and sixteen is when the original kitchenstarted. It was founded by Animare Fernack, which you met, Carl, that'sher. That was her husband that you met. They started it. Her goal was to bringlocal food to our community of access to better fish or more locally producedfood. So that was her goal and it's grown to what it is now. That's awesome,yeah, very cool, so how many members you have currently were cro we're atour we ave ad, our mat. I mean at the maximum since we since I was runningthe kitchen so we're up. I mean we don't have a lot. We have a small space,but we're probably at about fifteen hours, that's very coolly. Good! That'sreally good were also seeing a leaning towards when I first took over thekitchen. Most of our members were caters. You know food prep type, peopleand since the pandemic- and we've also moved since then to a new location.During the pandemic we moved, but I'm seeing a little bit more of a goingtowards a production side. Interesting...

Yeah. That's cool so tell me some ofthe products are coming out of there, so we've got and I've read those withme. I've got of course, figs. I still produce figs Apple Pie, cocktail mixout of the kitchen aten and I have one of an remember- comes up from Columbus,actually produces our Gabino being butter interesting and what so? Howwould I use this? So it was designed to be a replacement for peanut butter, sopeople who are allergic right, so it's designed to be used as a replacementfor that it tastes amazing like just I eat it. Actually straight up, we've got an elderberry syrup. Companycalled Sassy's elder boost, oh Berkel, they started producing and all of theseproducts of course fall into the hid department of bag yer. So that's whythey're using our kitchen we've got uncle Rick's special blend. That's aspice mix! It's amazing! Oh Excellent! So he's got savory smoky garlic, saltin the original yeah yeah. So, like I said, we've got when I startedthe kitchen. I was the only one producing a packaged good, so also real.All of these came on board since that, oh, that's, very cool, we're going totake a break when we come back, we're going to taste some apple pie, fig virgin version yeah. This is Erican David. We will be back. This is Eric and David. We are backwith a craft food classroom to podcast edition. So David Tell me what we'retrying well right now we're still sitting with the executive director ofidea works Katrina, and she is also the producer founder and maker of figsApple Pie, non alcoholic cocktail mix. So we do have a cup of this ready totry cerere.

Oh that's, really good! Oh my gosh, Icould say so ha to win the. I thank you so some of the times when you tastethis stuff, it's super sweet like overpoweringly sweet, and I think theydo it because then, when you add alcohol to it, but this isn't like that.This is like a really really good apple slider, with a hint of pie in the backyeah. This is good and it tastes natural though it's I jus, I feel like.I would love this over. Some, like Italian ice yeah, be good love a littleburden in there. Oh well, as a matter of fact, one of our biggestcustomers is a distillery down in hacking, ills, Ohio, really and they're,getting ready to open a restaurant up in their tasting room and that's whatthey want to do is make slushes out of it. He so do they have a bourbon theand they do moonshine. So what do you prefer with this? I love it with a good bourbon ice.Bourbon Moonshine, a good moon shine is good. If you want to go on the sweeterside, it's really good with like a whip cream vodka like a pinnacle, yeah,exactly right, the other thing in the summer time I like it with a peach,whiskey e S- I, U Pesco, is out of this yeah. It's amazing, you know just seesee this stuff could get dangerous yeah. What time is it and it still work W L,you know when you're mixing, that's still considered work, rd, of course,yeah or is very important. It is very important. It's yes! I underrated, andit's important. So what's this one? This is the caramel apple and believeit or not. The caramel apple was an idea from that same distillery. One ofthe guys say: Hey have you ever thought of might about making Caramel Apple,and I said no, I haven't, but I can so we did and that ends up being one oftheir most popular flavors as to right yeah. Absolutely you know it reminds meof an off the menu item that I crave in the fall at starbucks. You can ordertheir hot apple sider and it's not...

...actually made out of apple side. Idon't know what it's made up, but it's delicious at a late little thicker is it yeah, but notquite a lot to this is delicious is cranky it's it's kind of a genius concept rightbecause I mean it's out there. You know. Clearly people are using moonshine andthey're doing this, but you kind of like give them a short cut. I do yeahyeah, that's the beauty of it and it's a win for my customers in my retailcustomers, because, honestly they probably make more off of it than I doso. The way they pot yep and for every one bottle of moonshine that they sell,they can sell two bottles of figs. So it's a they love me as much as I lovethat right, yeah. Now that which is the perfect situation, if you're going tohave a product, that's right or what can people find your product, mostlylike? I said we're in the distillery? Okay, but we do have my first retaillocation is located in Lexington, Ohio at waynes country market, excellent,which is an awesome. Another awesome story because they grew from being justa little fruit, stand to something where they offer all kinds of products,local products and produce, and that type of thing so that's cool. I don'thave a lot of retail locations. I have it on Amazon right now. I don't have alot of Amazon business, but I also have not pushed it and that's one of thedown sides of running your own company in addition to another company. Is itsomething something always takes the back seat right at right right? So, aswe ask all entrepreneurs, what do you find? Is Your unfair advantage as anentrepreneur honestly, I am probably the only one that I know that came upwith the concept and and developed this. It's a one of a kind unided answer onno die, I'm not competing with anyone else. That's sitting on the market thathas you know fourteen other different types that they're competing with.That's really cool, very cool, your unfair advantages, you're, SMART!That's what I a yeah! That's exactly right! I I don't know anything aboutany of that, but I was dumb enough to...

...think that it was. You know that itwould taste good and people would buy it, and alcohol is really an easy thingto sell. Yeah Y, U N W the concept of having a mixer that they can ad alcoholto it's a win win. It is, it is, and it's really it's a fun job always saidthat I a lot of people go to work. They don't have fun, I can go, sell figs andpeople are always happy end. I love the name and yeah it just so before we letyou go. Can you tell our listeners where they can? If they want to tap inwith ideal works where they could absolutely you can look us up onlineand idea works Ohio Com, okay, we've got information on there for our shareuse kitchen, as well as our co working space, which is also very beautiful,awesome. Well, thank you so much for coming out to day. Thank you very mery,appreciate your having this and David. I think that's it for you and I to day.Is it yeah good? So then we can get. We can add some liquor to go the day started. That's right! Ifiveweight thanks for joining us. Thank you very much. This is Eric and Davidbring a new the craft food classroom, the podcast until next time, FA cease thanks for joining on the craft foodclassroom, podcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage ofgrowth brought to you by Pan c bank and central kitchen media to learn moreabout what we're doing visit us at the central dot kitchen. Please subscribeto this podcast to learn more about food entrepreneurs and their experiencein the craft. Food Business. T T.

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