Build, Grow, Feed
Craft Food Classroom
Craft Food Classroom

Episode · 6 months ago

Build, Grow, Feed

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Eric Diamond and co-host David Miller sit down with Walter Bonham of The Food Lab. He talks about his mission to get good food into his community. To meet this mission, he helps establish urban farms, build hoop houses and other structures to promote sustainable food production.

"My motto is to 'Build, Grow, Feed.'"

Also, sitting down in this episode is Korinna Goettel, the executive director of IdeaWorks, a shared-use kitchen and co-working space. She is also the founder and producer of Figg’s beverages, including Figg’s Cocktail mixes.

http://eatthefoodlab.com/our-story/
www.TheCentral.Kitchen
www.PNC.com
@ediblecleveland
@centralkitcle
@craftfoodclassroom
@figgs_mixers

Welcome to the craft food classroom podcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage of growth. Broughtto you by PNC bank and central kitchen media, and now here's your host, Eric Diamond. This is Eric Diamond, CEO of the Central Kitchen, bringingyou the next episode of the craft food classroom, the podcast. Iam super excited today because my cohost is not other than the money millionaire DavidMiller. Back in the building. Back in the building, man, it'sbeen a minute. It happened. I send. This is such a muchbetter platform. It's so much more relevant to what we're doing right. Craftfood classroom is up and running and we're all slated to knock it out thepark this year, hopefully. Give me a give me a little plug andcraft food classroom. Yeah, so the craft food classroom. We offer anonline class that runs five weeks. It's all things food. We go fromweek one we talked about your life plan. Why do you even want to bein the food arena anyway? What are some of the obstacles and hurdles, and then how dedicated and discipline are you? And then in week twowe talk about what's in your product, which that begins to really bring ithome for a lot of entrepreneurs because that's what they're there for. So everybodywants to talk about their product or what they do in the food arena.And then after that we talked about marketing and media and branding. And inthe next week is financials with you. Yeah, so all the money thatgoes into the business. Where's it going? Why is it going there? Howare you tracking it? And then after that, the fifth week iswhat we consider pretty much the wrap up week, and we talked about distribution, wholesale retail. So once you go through the craft food classroom, youhave five weeks of just really intensive training on certain topics and a lot ofthe folks that finish and wrap up feel really well prepared to, you know, hit the ground running it right,...

...well, right, well. Theycan find that on our website, right. Yeah, you could go to thecentral kitchen website. You can get links to the craft food classroom fromthere. Cool, awesome. So, David, we've got two friends heretoday from richland grow up. Why don't you introduce our first guests? Yeah, so we have walt who come to us from the richland grow up.Walt is a farmer out there. Actually, we're going to set the stage andlet walt tell us a little bit about herself, because I can't doit like him and plus he has a unique background. So we'll let walttalk. Tell us a little bit, Walt, about what you do atRichland and how you got into farming in the first place. Right. Thankyou. Thank you, guys for having me down here. My name isWalter Bonham. I am the operator and creator of the food lap and Iam one small business made up of nine businesses total. They represent the richlandgrow up, which is a cooperative of farming, cooperative in a man's forthe Ohio and know we service our original county. We represent richland county asa whole. That's cool. So how did you get into it? Well, I got in pretty much the same way that the other other eight membersgot in. Involved was we all had different passions for a growing food andkind of like in our own silos share. So me personally, I just willa lot of my journey just came around me want to make changes myown personal life. You want to make changes in my family's life around whatthey were eating, what they were doing. My motto my business is to build, grow feed. So I had to grow aspect in a farm,aspect that I wanted to do in my business. Sure, and then whenit's when the project came about. That that we are connected to the microfarm project. That's where we all kind of collectively kind of heard about thisopportunity to growing farm and we all had similar interest into farming and jumped onboard. How long ago is that? That was about? We're going toour third year, wow right now. So so a little over two yearsago is just a concept that was kind of being thought about. We putit on paper and then now we got buildings up in where actually we're actuallyofficial business now and we have tons of customers. Now we're starting to serveproduce now. Excellent. So where did...

...the love of farming come from?Really, it just really like I was kind of a point in my lifepersonally where I just want to make some changes. Wasn't really happy with myhealth, my body and things like that. So I just wanted wasn't something yougrow up around. No, I did not grow around it and Ididn't did not have a background and farm in my background personally use in businessand management. Things worked for a bunch of companies and manage but employees doingwhat to do different things for years and it turned into me this wanted tomake some personal decisions to do better and find places that I could work forwardthat we're more fulfilling to me, sure, and I'm kind of going about thatjourney and all had an entrepreneur spirit to so, yeah, a lotof kind of start coming out of me. So how could teach yourself to farm? I know that's yeah, yeah, you know what, I'll tell you. Like you know, it's a journey. That's one of the coolestthings about our cooperative is that all of us started out doing something different.We had a few people that were kind of growers and things, but nobodywould was really farming. So everybody had different background. So would really helpedme with the process was the training that was offered in microfarm project. Weall trained for about a year plus. Oh, very cool, and sothat was literally allowed me to kind of start understanding crop start just kind ofgetting a feel for what it was like to farm. That summer too,when we first started training. I have volunteered on the farm too as wellover the farm, and so, yeah, just came from a lot of methis training, getting involved and just getting my hands there do it rely. Who? Who allowed you guys to do the training? Was that ranthrough a program yeah, so the microfarm project was actually a grant that wegot through FFA are okay, sore, and it was in conjunction with OhioState and I'm Anyci see and some o our community partners, anyciics, theNorth End Community Improvement Collaborative, Gotcha. They actually host my farm and anothermember, Vince Owen's farm, actually own their toilve Acre site in location.That's cool. So it was all kind of a big project. They cametogether and the way the grant worked was we had it was a it wasa matching million dollar grant. Wow. So we were able to come upwith half million dollars in match and then...

...half million dollars in financial match.Oh Wow, be able to match that million bucks. And part of itwas in the kitchen what you're going to meet create a little later here.It but a bunch of it was like a lot of community support coming onboard to match that in Kine and allowing us to see the vision of whatwe were trying to do and create. And we end up getting the grantand then, two million dollars later, sprout across the board. I'm tonof ton of our great in our project is a lot of research. Soit is the research around defects, of what's going on with the farmers,the community, how we're impacting on the land and things were growing on.There's just many aspects around what the project is all about business. It goesbeyond the food right now. That's good. So in a law in the courseof was creating the cooperative. So we actually formed a business through thiswhole process. That's cool. So what kind of things did you grow?Well, man, as a cooperative, we grow tons of different things allright now. The way we're set up, we have a marketer that tells uswhat to grow Gosha, so that kind of takes a lot of theguessing out of it for us. He's able to kind of presell different thingsand talk to different customers and kind of figure out what we need to grow. But currently, right now we're growing a few different types of lettuce.We're growing turnips right now. Nice we're growing spinnach right now. We justkind of came into who are our early spring seasure. So now we're tryingto transition into the summer as well. So people have gotten tomatoes in theground now, we getting peppers in the ground now, things like that andgetting our outside bed. It's going to so who's your and consumer of theproduct? Right now we sell to a few different food hubs. Oh cool, which is really kind of cool. Also, we are our biggest customersright now, our food hubs, and then some of our local restaurants reallylike that we've been able to grow what they need exactly in their restaurants andkeep them from traveling to get produced from different small markets and Asian markets andthings like that or email order and stuff from California and stuff they can get, you know, right down the street from us now. Well, Ilike local. Nothing like local. So, under your initiative is there? Arewe seeing more minorities take part in...

...the in the farming part, orare you? Are you seeing that happening at Richland, where there's more minorityinterest in farming or no? Well, as actually a cool concept. AreCooperative is made up of the nine members, for them are urban and then fiveand five of them are rule. So we do see a lot ofinterest and especially in our urban site now because there's eight high tunnels on thistwelve hitcor site and there's like outside raised beds and a ton of stuff goingon. We also host a farmers market there too and things like that.So now we are starting to see a lot of interest from folks who whowould have never thought about farming or growing food. Right. Cool. Yeah, so where do you see yourself going with this? Well, man,I mean as a whole. I see the cooperative really looking into doing thingseven outside of our produce. So kind of growing our brand in our businessby right now we're connected with the School Mans, city schools, and nowtoo, so we will be. Will have kids involved four through sixth gradelearning about agriculture and also helping get involved in the kids getting college credit,wow, starting seventh grade through high school, and allow them to actually come outof high school with college credit that can go towards act agree and differentthings like that, like they do with like nursing. You see those kindof programs. Yeah, so we've been able, because of our project andinitiatives that we're doing, we've been able to, you know, tie indifferent things like that in our high school, in our middle school, begin hightunnels of summer we have initiative to try to get involved with selling foodinside of the school. Right now. We're trying to we're work with otherpeople to we're getting our food and our local hospitals. Wow, now toand things like that as well. That's man, you guys got it.So, yeah, we're just trying to expand, you know, different waysand just trying to just, you know, selling the produce and just trying tofigure out different ways that our brand and our food awareness can you affectour community. That's super cool. So walk me through this real quick.Well, if I to our listeners,...

...people who maybe no pun intended,but a little green to the whole growing of vegetables and stuff, can yougrow all year around? Yeah, it we actually can here now because wethat's part of us, been micro farmers. We all have high tunnels. Okay, on right now. So we all have small plots that we kindof take on and we collectively harvest together to try to be able to sellas a hole. So we don't want farmer does have to take along tryingto grow so much individually. YEA, but UMB. Yeah, so likein the wintertime we just we just plant winner crops that can really take it. So we do like different spinach and carrots, switch charred, you know, beats and different things like that. Under the high tunnels you don't haveto worry about and they will continue to grow slowly through the winter, butthen come screen time they'll be ready to harvest. That's that's sweet. Wehad some of their products and love local basket. We did, we did. We got a connection with the microgreens. I think it was the end oflast summer. Yeah, it was some. You guys got some ofthe different Greens that we had and actually my spinach made it too. OhVer, yeah, might my winner spinach that I actually grew made it toyou guys the Best Gul here. That's a small, small world. Thatis a small world. So we are going to take a quick break herefrom our sponsor, PNC bank. When we come back, I want totry some of this lettuce. Perfect. We get the crunch on the miccrafton the bike bills that we pay some bills. So we will be back. There are diamond David Villar with the craft food classroom the podcast. Thispodcast is brought to you by PNC Bank for more than a hundred sixty yearswe've been committed to providing our clients with great service and powerful financial expertise tohelp them meet their financial goals. We're proud of our longstanding history of supportingonly our customers but our community employees and shareholders. For more information on PNCbank, please visit wwwccom. This is Eric and David. We are backwith the craft food classroom the podcast. How's everyone feeling? Feeling good?Feeling feeling really good. Filling better now...

...that I see some fresh produce infront of me. Yeah, so well, why don't you walk us through whatyou bought up today for us to try? Yeah, bought just afew different things that are in season for us here right now. I havesome scream mix lettuce. We have some scollions here, we have some aMAZOONA EASAN mixed slow variety of Greens. We have some spinach. Do wehave some of Red Spinach as well? Some and switch charred, and thenalso we have some French radishes and then some Easter eggradishes. All right,a little bit. So what the purple ones are? What those are?Easter, Easter? All right, sweet and I'll grab some of this.What's this right here that I'm glad that's that really spinach right there. Awesome, incredible hulk. HMM. That stuff looks wonderful to beautiful munching on theMIC. That's delicious. HMM. So those are radishes in that that spinachin particularly we grow for a restaurant, a local restaurant in Mansfield. Theseare much sweeter radishes than you're typically used to. Yeah, yeah, people, I think radishes get a bad name. Yeah, right, who's are delicious? Yeah, they do. radishes do get a pet. You likeradishes, though? I do. Yeah, I do. I made a mistake. Quick Story. I like radishes, I like messing around with them andwe had so many die Kon radishes and I love local offerings that Idecide to take some and cut them up and mix them with some potatoes onthat I did under girl. The concept was just to kind of see howthey cook up and see, you know, if I can incorporate some fresh radishinto my kids diet without them knowing. Right, big mistake, ruther.Yeah, because you cut the potatoes up and they cook up really goodwith the butter and onion, but these things they don't fry up and theyget real soggy, and so it was. The kids were really like what isthis chewy stuff in my food? I was like, oh, that'sa radish, and I got scared them away from like, we got nothing, no, no love for that. There's no way. How do soadvise me. How do you make this...

...kid friendly? But you know whatyou can? You can sneak radishes and turnips into mass potatoes. All right. Yeah, so you were on the right track there. Yeah, andMash them up, make them in there, on them and yeah, they won'teven they won't even be able to. That's good on a back end.It has a little spice, it does I like it a lot.Wonderful stuff. So this is only your third year of growing? Yeah,actually, we just complete so we went through a year plus of training kindand we just completed our own kind of first year. We're rolling into ourkind of second season. That's that's awesome. And so you are you feeling betterabout where you're at with it, your knowledge base and what you're doingwith the men? You know where there are. There's so many things tolearn about growing food and I think, like all of us are, ourcooperative we had kind of the right intentions on what we were doing and things, but nobody probably could really understand until you kind of get involved with itand you do it, the learning curve and what it actually really takes andeverything you had to kind of worry about in the farmer world. But it'sbeen beneficial and we've been learning a lot. We learned a lot of less fouryears, but there's tons more to learn. Are you? Are youcontinue to train or right now, is it just a kind of like you, you do it with the cooperative. You guys go through stuff together collectively, or is there some kind of unified training or continuing education around farming thatyou? Yeah, are more are more formal training is over, but wedo have different extensive professors that we can reach out to in different things now. So I would definitely say we all are still in training and then weall are still picking up new crops, like these Asian Greens that I gotover here. This is my first year, first time growing those. But then, as far as spinach, though, I've grown spinach three times now,only three, three different seasons now. So okay, different parts of theseason, but so, you know, some things I'm getting familiar with,while new things are just coming, coming on board to at the sametime. It's for all of us. Okay, do you guys do CollarGreens? You know what? Yes, yes, actually we do have colorGreens growing right now at the urban farm, at the ncice urban farm, andalso we just sold a bunch of mustard. So we just clear aton of some must mustard green students. Wait, I was some of thecollege. What do you like growing?...

You what's your personal favorite? Man, you know what, Gosh, I grown. I grow some stuff withthe CO operative. Not Actually had the opportunity working with one of our oneof our farmers, I'm smarko, but to grow some things at our houselast year that we weren't required to grow through the cooperative. So in myin my growing experience, I read a lot of fun growing watermelons. Rightly, we grown melons and I can't ops and things like that. They're notas easy as you would think. Grown the melt. They were easier.Actually really like Um, you know, they require a lot less maintenance.Okay, right, so little maintenance, lower disease pressure, low bug pressure, you know those things, if you can keep keep the animals away fromright. Ye, say, they they were a little bit easier and theykind of you know, they vining now. They do their own thing and thingslike that. So I have a fun growing melons and as far asthe different things I've grown for the Cooperative, they these Asian Greens and grown adifferent greens. I think are pretty cool. Yeah, that you're prettycool to it. They're pretty little maintenance but you know, I do likethe variety in the color and things. That the way to look in thetunnels. It's cool, pretty easy to that is cool, I guess.Do you guys do Pumpkins at all? Ever? No, no, no, no, we haven't gone grown anything like that yet. We really prettymuch up stayed into the nuch of things that we know we can sell.For sure, there's been talks of kind of experiment and doing different things.I know some of our other farmers have grown different just like I was saying, grown different things outside of the CO operative, but as far as USselling, selling Um Pumpkins and things, no, we haven't. We haven'treached out. A last thing for me. Do you guys do fruit? Notreally currently. Okay, right now it's been. It's been in thetalks. Fruit is a little bit different process, especially in Ohio, ifyou don't talking about doing any trees or do any baby bushes and things likethat right those and takes some years. There's some talks to me about somestrawberries or different things. But, put again, it's been this really justbeen focused on what the market once for us, absolutely, instead of usjust growing and then trying to create a market or taking chances of not sellingthings. That's smart, smart, what you're doing so smart. We Talkas David and I is entrepreneurs. We're...

...talking with entrepreneurs. We always askhim what your unfair advantage is, what are you better at than anybody else, as you've been up through this business journey. I think that a hugeadvantage that we have as a cooperative is that nobody was growing food it reallyin this in our area. Really, yeah, in the way that wewere to try to market, the way that we were in so on.So if you think, if you think about it, you know, weknew for a fact that like millions of dollars worth for produced sales we're leavingmantil like every year. Yeah, and it's like, you know, whydon't we try to capture some of this? Like, I can grow, letus right, right, and like we know, like people are buying. Let us. So can I, like, you know, can Igrow a little bit of your letters for you? Right, sure, samething, you know, with some of these major crops. And then alsosome of the things we start finding out that niche that, you know,people are ordering stuff or can't get ahold of stuff from, like hey,you know, I can go out of that right, you know, wecan try to. We can try to go that for you and things too. So I think that's really a niche that we had, is that,you know, people weren't really focused on trying to grow the way we were. In our area. We have a lot of soil and corn going onand we have some some farmers in the area and things, but that,but they're not as focused as we were collectively on trying to tack the marketsand things that we do in another vantage is us been a cooperative yeah,right, all right. So if I was, you know, Walter Ble, I'm trying to do this, you know, my own and knocking onall these restaurant doors and so on and things, you know, I wouldn'tbe able to buy be sustainable, as we can't as a whole. Youever sell our farmers market? Know, we as a cooperative, we don't. I don't sell at a farmer's market, but some of our other cooperative membersdo. Gotcha, and and and I think a few more cooperative membersare probably going to look into maybe trying that this year or even the onesthat did tell a farmer's markets last year will be. But I will saythat we do host a farmer's market at the NYCI see urban farm starting inJune, every Thursday. Awesome. So we have a local market that's righton the farm. Oh, cool. What time do you guys have that? Yeah, I'm being starts at for from I'm stinking. I think theythat we're going to do it for to seven. If I'm mistaking, excellent. Well, cool, three, seven, four or something. Yeah. Well, this has been awesome. It has been awesome. You have lastquestion. I do. Okay, I want it and I I'm sure you'reprobably going to get to it, but...

I'm a cut in line. Canyou tell our listeners where they can find you guys and your website? Definitely, definitely. Are you guys want to go to a richland grow up inthat G GROP? Okaycom we just updated our website to so a bunch ofcool information on there as well, and then to learn more about the urbanfarm you can go to any CI see Ohio Dot Org, and then youcan find out a little bit about some of the urban farmers and things thatwe have where my farmers located. Awesome. That's so cool. Thanks again wellfor coming out today and bringing to some of these awesome produce that youcreated. I'm so impressed and jealous. They look at hamtful talent. Youknow I don't have that talent. Well, I will. Thank you so much. Well are thank you for the pleasure. Thanks well, care thisis area diamond, David Miller, bringing you the craft food classroom the podcast. We are back, David. How you feeling? I am feeling betterthan ever. Really, yeah, better than ever. Yeah, I'm backin better than ever. It's the best day of my life. All Right, why'd you go ahead and tell us who we got talking today? SoI believe that I don't know. This is the fact that we're a liveagain. Today is such a raggedy drive in. All I saw it wasrain and tail lights. That's all I saw. Missed in tail lights.So to make it it's a great day. I'm happy to be alive and wehave a great guest with us today. We have Karina ghettle, right,said it right, and Karinas the executive director of idea works. Right, that's correct. Yeah, can you tell us a little bit about ideaworks? So idea works is located in Mansfield, Ohio. We are ashared use kitchen and also a coworking space. Very cool. Cool, and youalso are an entrepreneur. Is that right? I am. Yeah,by accident. Yeah, what? Let's talk about this story, because it'sinteresting how it all kind of connects. Right. So you started off asan entrepreneur and what is your product?...

So I make an apple pie,apple cider based cocktail mix called called figs. Figs liquid innovations is the name ofthe company. We have some here today. We're getting ready to sampleabsolutely that. Like, is it like a Shrub? Now, it's not. Okay, cool, not. You know, what it's really based on? Is the Apple Pie Moonshine. Yeah, so it's based on that. Justimagine taking the alcohol out. So do you recommend it with alcohol?Them? Absolutely, okay, and that's the that's kind of show I'm talkingabout. Yeah, yeah, that's that's the best place to start. Okay, obviously people use it for other real we have. I have a sweetheat flavor I didn't bring with me because I didn't have any. A lotof people use that for marinating their pork to before they sell. Very cool. Wait, hold on, you got a sweet heat that you messed with. This like a sweet heat that's its own flavor. So it's got alittle burn to so I took the Apple Pie, the original flagship flavor,and added some Helopino. Okay, so it's got a little burn. Yeah, no, that's cool. So you said it was by accident. Well, how did that happen? So I'd been making Apple Pie moonshine just forthe FAM. Sure put it in the basics. It our story, masonedour right and we were thinking about you know, we could take the alcoholout of this and just make it into a mixer. Why isn't anybody doingthis? Because to make Apple Pie moonshine takes a lot of, you know, ingredients. I'm not a lot of ingradients, but it CIDER, andsure usually made it in great, big, huge batches. So it took awhile and I had a job at the time that we had that ideagot and then I shortly thereafter did not have a job. Wow, yeah, so I was like, well, this would be a great time tokick this product off. So we did. So that's where the accidental comes in. And so did you find the kitchen and start producing there or sothat? We didn't find the kitchen that that I'm using now. We haveactually using like a lot of people who need a certified Odia, High Departmentof Agriculture approved kitchen or location, we started bottling in a bar. Reallydid it yet they weren't using their kitchen anymore. It was just a bar. was a week mostly a weekend bar.

Gotcha, and so we were bottlingthere and then we made a we I think they sold it or whatever. We needed to look for a new location. So we had a coupleof different other locations where we bottled. I ended up finding the kitchen thatI manage now. Started bottling there in December of two thousand and sixteen andthen like early in January I got an email from from the founder of thecompany say we don't have a manager anymore. Could you run the kitchen for usuntil we figure out what we want to do with it. Oh,so from there I took on. It became a good thing. The companykept growing, so the decided to keep it in operation and I took overas and director, as a director of just the kitchen, and then justlast year took over executive director of ie it works. Oh, very cool. So the kitchen is named what it's currently need. Entrepreneurs Kitchen antro verseare when we went from we went from being a for profit to a nonprofitunder idea works. Okay, we're in the middle of transitioning to idea workskitchen. Oh, ideal works kitchen. Great. So they will keep youknow, name, name, brand or the brand identification. WHO started andwin? So it started in two thousand and sixteen. Summer of two thousandand sixteen is when the original kitchen started. It was founded by Anna Marie FERNIAC, which you met, curl that's her. That was her husband thatyou met, and they started it. Her goal was to bring local foodto our community, access to better food, sure, more locally produced food.So that was her goal and it's grown to what it is now.That's awesome. Yeah, very cool. So how many members you have currently? We're great. We were at our we are at our mat I meanat the maximum since we since I was running the kitchen. So we're up. I mean we don't have a lot, we have a small space, butwe're probably at about fifteen metals. That's very, totally good. That'sreally good. We'll also seeing a leaning towards when I first took over thekitchen, most of our members were caters, you know, food prep type people. And since the pandemic, and we've also moved since then to anew location. During the pandemic we moved. But I'm seeing a little bit moreof a going towards a production side.

Interesting. Yeah, that's cool.So tell me some of the products are coming out of there. Sowe've gotten and I've brought those with me. I've got, of course, figs. I still produced figs, apple pie cocktail mix out of the kitchen. Excellent. And I have one of a member comes up from Columbus actuallyproduces our Goobonzo bean butter. Interesting. Yeah, and what? So howwould I use this? So it was designed to be a replacement for peanutbutter for that right, people who are allergic. Right, so it's designedto be used as a replacement for that. It tastes amazing, like just Ieat it. Actually, straight up, we've got an elderberry Syrup Company calledSassy's elder boost over cool. They started producing and all of these productsof course follow into the High Department of Egg Yep, so that's why they'reusing our kitchen. We've got uncle Rick's special blend. That's a spice mix. It's amazing. Oh, excellent. She's got savory, smoky garlic saltin the original. Yeah, yeah, so, like I said, we'vegot what I started. I the kitchen. I was the only one producing apackaged good. So also, really all of these came on board sincethen. Oh, that's very cool. We're going to take a break.When we come back we're going to taste some apple pie figs virgin version.Man, this is Eric David. We will be back. This is Ericand David. We are back with the craft food classroom to podcast addition.So, David, tell me what we're trying. Well, right now we'restill sitting with the executive director of idea works, Katrina, and she isalso the producer, founder and maker of figs Apple Pie non alcoholic cocktail mix. So we do have a cup of this ready. Yeah, to trycheers. Oh, that's really good.

Oh my gosh, it's I couldsay so people in the Pie. Thank you. So some of the timeswhen you taste this stuff it's super sweet, like overpoweringly sweet, and I thinkthey do it because then when you add alcohol to it. But thisisn't like that. This is like a really, really good apple slider witha hint of pie in the back. Yeah, this is good and ittastes natural, though it's it's like a Jesus. I feel like I wouldlove this over some like Italian ice. Yeah, we good love a littlebourbon in there. Oh well, as a matter of fact, one ofour biggest customers is a distillery down and hacking hills, Ohio, really,and they're getting ready to open a restaurant up in they're tasting room and that'swhat they want to do is make slushies out of it. There's all right. So do they have a bourbon? They Look Bourbon. They do amoonshine. So well, what do you prefer with this? I love itwith a good Bourbon, Pi s bourbon moon shines. A good moonshine isgood. If you want to go on the sweeter side. It's really goodwith like a whip cream vodka, like a pinnacled yeah, exactly right.The other thing in the summertime, I like it with a peach whiskey prease. It with the PROSECCO is out of this yeah, it's amazing. Youknow, that's see, see, this stuff could get dangerous. Yeah,what time is it? And it's still work, you know, when you'remixing, that's still considered work urd. Of course. Yeah, important,is very important. It is very important. It's, yes, underrated and it'simportant. So what's this one? This is the CARAMEL apple and,believe it or not, the CARAMEL apple was an idea from that same distillery. One of the guys say, Hey, have you ever thought of my aboutmaking Caramel Apple, and I said no, I haven't, but Ican. So we did and that ends up being one of their most popularflavors. Is that right? Yeah, absolutely. You know, it remindsme of an off the menu item that I crave in the fall at starbucksyou can order their hot apple CID and...

...it's not actually made out of appleside. I don't know what it's made up, but it's delicious. Ata lot a little thicker, is it? Yeah, but not quite a lot. A. This is delicious. It's thank you. It's it's kindof a genius concept, right, because, I mean it's out there, youknow, clearly people are using moonshine and they're doing this, but youkind of like give them a shortcut. I do. Yeah, yeah,that's a beauty of it and it's a win for my customers, in myretail customers, because honestly, they probably make more off of it than Ido the way they price it. YEA, and for every one bottle of Moonshinethat they sell, they can sell two bottles of figs. So it'sa they love me as much as I love that. Right. Yeah,now, that's which is the perfect situation if you're going to have a product. That's right. What can people find your product? Mostly, like Isaid, we're in the distillery, okay, but we do have my first retaillocation is located in like Seington, Ohio, Wayne's country market, excellent, which is an awesome another awesome story, because they grew from being just alittle fruit stand to something where they offer all kinds of products for localproducts and produce and that type of thing. So that's cool. I don't havea lot of retail locations. I have it on Amazon right now.I don't have a lot of Amazon business, but I also have not pushed it, and that's one of the downsides of running your own company in additionto another company, is it's something something I always takes the backseat. Right, so, right, right. So, as we ask all entrepreneurs what youdo, you'd find is your unfair advantage as an entrepreneur. Honestly,I am probably the only one that I know that came up with the conceptand and develop this. It's a one of a kind, unique product,and so I'm not compete. I'm not competing with anyone else that's sitting onthe market that has, you know, fourteen other different types that they're competingwith. That's really cool, very cool. Your unfair advantage is you're smart.That's what I had. Yeah, that's exactly right. I don't knowanything about any of that, but I...

...was dumb enough to think that itwas you know, that it would taste good and people would buy it,and alcohol is really an easy thing to sell. Yes, the concept ofhaving a mixer that they can add alcohol to. It's a win win.It is. It is and it's really eat. It's a fun job.I always say that. I got a lot of people go to work theydon't have fun. I can go sell fags and people are always happy.Yeah, that's right, and I love the name. And Yeah, andjust so before we let you go, can you tell our listeners where theycan if they want to tap in with ideal works? Where they could?Absolutely, you can look us up online and idea works. Ohiocom. Okay, we've got information on there for our shared use kitchen as well as ourco working space, which is also very beautiful awesome. Well, thank youso much for coming out today. Thank you very much. Appreciate you havingthis and, David, I think that's it for you and I to day, is it? Yeah, good, so then we can get we canadd some liquor to this gets to day started. That's right, it's fiveo'clock somewhere. Yeah, right, thanks for joining us. Thank you verymuch. This is Eric and David bringing new the craft food classroom the podcast. Until next time, PAS face, thanks for joining on the craft foodclassroom podcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage of growth. Brought to you by PNC bank and central kitchen media. To learn moreabout what we're doing. visit us at the central dot kitchen. Please subscribeto this podcast to learn more about food entrepreneurs and their experience in the craftfood business.

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