When you're asking for your community to support you, you've got to go backward and support your community
Craft Food Classroom
Craft Food Classroom

Episode · 6 months ago

When you're asking for your community to support you, you've got to go backward and support your community

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

"When you're asking for your community to support you, you've got to go backward and support your community."@heinens@popeskitchen@popescocktails@centralkitcle@ediblecleveland@craftfoodclassroom@foodsuperpowerswww.Heinens.comwww.PopesKitchen.comwww.PopesCocktails.comwww.TheCentral.kitchen/classroomwww.TheCentral.kitchenhttp://lp.thecentral.kitchen/newsletter-subscriptionClark Pope brings wisdom, inspiration, and, most importantly, his craft cocktail pouches onto the podcast set with Eric and David.   This fun-filled, mojito-fueled episode goes from Clark receiving the 3rd key ever issued at the Cleveland Culinary Launch Kitchen to where he sits today as the owner of 2 powerhouse brands and dozens of successful products.

This podcast is brought to you by Hyden's, founded in one thousand nine hundred and twenty nine and Shaker Heights, Ohio, by local butcher Joe Hyden. Hindans is grown to twenty three total locations, with nineteen stores in the Cleveland area and for in the north shore suburbs of Chicago. After years of building connection with Midwest farmers, it became a part of Hyden's nature to do business with smaller regional companies. Today, Hydans is proud to carry nearly seven hundred Midwest made non produce items that are present in all departments. For more information, go to hyandscom. Welcome to the craft food classroom podcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage of growth. Brought to you by central kitchen media and now here's your host, Eric Diamond. This is Erican David bringing you the next episode of the craft food classroom, the podcast. David, I feeling my friend, I'm feeling good. I'm excited. Yeah, me too. There's drinks around. I yeah, there's drinks. I spelt pizza. Man, what's up with you? Man? How are you doing? Hapen? You know I'm doing well. Kids are back in school. You know it was been a challenging year for them with the whole pandemic, but they're back in and getting settled in. So tell me real quick, because I'm you are our children start school next Tuesday, so you got a week on the YEP. How was it? So and I'll tell you what some my o, my oldest boy, aid, and he is going into sixth grade and so this is the year where they change classes and he's at the LM. He's at the Middle School now. He was nervous. You know, he was nervous and I could just tell you know, you know yours are tougher. There's a time your dad and you can tell Ye. He came home though. He was like, I love it, there's stoke again. We will go back and awesome. Now today was the first day for my son Lincoln, and he was very, very nervous because he said this is the first year he's ever been in a school where his brother wasn't there yet. His brothers moved up. He had to survive on his own. He had to fend for herself. He's like, I didn't always walk into my classroom. We always walk me to the bus and I'm like, you're going to grown up, you're going to be good. Yep, that's good. Thanks for asking. No problem, and we are very excited to talk with our next guest. Speaking of growing up, growing up, you know, wow, Clark, pope pope's cocktails and products. And Welcome, Clark. Yeah, well, you buddy. Welcome. It's an honor to have you on the podcast. It's an absolute privilege. I will argue I do try to grow older and not necessarily up. Well, yeah, every time you ask Clark, how you doing, Clark, what do you up to, Clark? Now? Five, five, five. Yeah, so, Clark, you are probably what, one of the oldest members of CCLK, now central kitchen, and you were one number three. I've key number three, really see. Okay, the twenty hundred threation get out,...

...and that would have been in two thousand and thirteen. God, yeah, they really that old with that all wasn't thirteen. It's been a while. It was Mason, screamery, chill pop and pope's. All three wonderful brands are still around today. Yeah, they's that right? Yeah, yeah, great way, that's the way to start it off. Yeah, Clark was in our very first ever incubator class. I have a signature, an apron my memories, right Storre Apron. There were ten companies, Yep, and I believe six of us are still selling. Yep. Three have their own standalone operations, such as Nultchipop masons are there in their thing, and so, you know, it's a heck of a group to start off. Yeah, heck, yeah, that's a that's a solid, solid girl. Was a solid, solid group. So before that, though, I love your story. So before that, let's walk back. You were you weren't always in food. No, No, before I did this, I was actually a high school special education and history teacher. Wow, jake, right Shaker, couple years downtown Cleveland, and then immediately I was at the Copley Fair Lawn School district at their Copley Farrell in high school. Wow, how long did you do that? Like where you teaching? So got married in two thousand. My wife, a saint and a great patient woman, said Oh sure, let's get married and you can leave corporate and go back to school to become a teacher, and so I did that instantly and we did about three years of substitute teaching, running my catering company in the evenings and taking classes at night. Wow. And then so I think I sub and four years, taught downtown for three years, got my master's and taught at Shaker for three years, taught in Copley for three years and then branched out and had this opportunity. When I left Copley I was already doing products for a fresh work and I had products in the strong swim market districts and in whole foods. Okay, and had about eleven items that we were in regular rotation. Oh Wow. Yeah, where does this love of food come for you? Because even when you were teaching you had a catering company and I know it. He's like working on this catering company at night. Well, we had a really interesting base rule of my house growing up. If you cooked, you did not do dishes. Andy. Yeah, this work for everybody except, of course, my sister, because my father would just do her dishes. Yeah, see the baby girls, my sign olds these, okay, but so, I mean they came from that. And then a lot of boy scouts, my boy scout troupe. I'm an Eagle Scout Class of ninety one, and my boy scout troupe we went camping every month. Oh, wow, and when you were camping all the time, if the food is great, it doesn't matter if the weather is not interesting. Yeah, I guess it. Yeah, got seventy two and sunshine and you're having roasted potatoes and vegetables and Sirloin and a foil packet, right, and you're doing, you know, pies for dessert. It's a great week. A heck, yeah, if it's thirty degrees and cold and you're still having grilled steaks, it's still a great yea, I agree. I agree. The peanut...

...butter and Jelly and cold don't cut it right. Right. And One of the gentlemen that I got my Egel Scott with is actually graduated from Johnson and Wales, top of his class. Really like we had a lot of people industry got out of my boy scout troupe and are in food in some direction, because that's the first things you learned was how to Cook, how to manage a fire and first aid, because the knives and firepart. Right. Yeah, that's great. It's how do you cooking camp? COOKD AT CAMP? How did you start your catering company? So you know, you always have these opportunities of soft knocks right. And I was a youth advisor at my church and one of the other youth advisors her best friend from college was getting married and she was going to host the bridal shower. And not a lot of people know this. This the roots of this actual story. The groom's mother was being very uptight and pushy and her son wasn't going to marry a woman whose best friend thought it was okay to do beer and pizza boy. And you know, we're all very young, you know, Midi s like twenties at this point, and I'm like, I'll do all the food because I love to entertain, I love to do food. You just pay for the groceries, I'll do the whole thing. She's like, what's that get me? I so you just blame everything on the cator, and she did so. She called the the the groom's mother calls and and she's like, Oh, I got a cater and instantly every complaint went away. Yes, so everything that happened, the caterer did the flowers. The cater and I did do the flowers but, like anything, just got the blame for it right, which is completely fine. And my whole day was we did MIMOSAS and every time the hosts MIMOSA got down to about half, I would literally just swap it right out of her hand. Brown full, yeah, and I'm Brown. You know, Leslie, I love you if you hear this. And so that was my that was my first quote catering. And then maybe a year later, and this is well before getting married, she was doing a thing at the Beck Center. I'll never forget. This is like art opening for for women's art or something, and they had a speaking form MMM, and then in the lobby, just gallery area, they had all the art and I'm like, okay, it's an art thing. And I did this gorgeous just like one post display was wag of of Gossamer to another display, to another display, and it was gorgeous. Wow. And the doors opened and they came in like a horde of beat and I just been remember being so destract because they did not eat symmetrically crazy. That's awesome. Yeah, that is so. Then fast forward you, you and Trevor Hook up and you start doing some products for fresh fork. I remember those days. Yeah, so we did a cancer benefit of the house. There's free will offering barbecue and we get about a hundred people raise about six seven hundred dollars of time, and trevor shows up and says, Hey, this really great barbecue sauce. Can you make it from local tomatoes? And I was a member fresh working. We've been buying hundreds of pounds of tomatoes for...

...candy and I'm like, of course I can. Yeah, and it was summer break and so I know twenty court roasting pan. I knocked out three hundred quarts of barbecue sauce for Labor Day. Oh really, and I think I charged him four dollars a bottle. And there was like all this unplanned money which of course we didn't bother with the cost of good goals. And so I just took this one hundred and I bought the snow blower. I still used to this then, and that's how that started. And it just like a back into the school year and Trevor would be like Hey, I've got all these leftover red peppers and I'm like drop them by the House. Yeah, we would do roasted red peppers and all of these things that I was doing for my family. We just then scaled it. Yeah, and then when CCLK formally CCLK opened up. It was opportunity to pull it out of the house, because at some point even the gracious patiences that is my wife. Four Tho pounds of heirloom tomatoes in your front living room, apparently, is the actual limit. Yeah, of a wife Babi. Yeah, thanks, you were wondering that's what that might be. Yeah, I could see that. I could totally see that. Less surface. She's more patient than mine, I'm sure. Yeah, thirty five hundred pounds. She was good, but thounds like you're fine. It was. So you came and you started making some products. What we're some of your very first pducts of barbecue sauce, I remember. I also remember my favorite was the Estrawberry Balsamic. Lad You still make that. So we'd make the stronger balsamic in very rare occasions because Straw willsom is awesome. So we basically get my church had a strawberry festival and it rained. So we like three hundred pounds a lift over strawberries that nothing had been happening to them. We'd simply cut them. But yeah, so I bought them all from the church, brought them down to the kitchen, we roasted them, which really brings some concentrates that sugar then purade them with balsamic vinegar and just a small touch of additional sugar into this really beautiful rich sauce. But it's one of those things that's phenomenal, but it does require an education to the consumer. How do I use this? Right, right, right, yeah, and it's very difficult to introduce something that new. Yeah, and at the time there I still to this day, have my fore hot sauces, my to barbecue sauces, my spice rub, three bloody marry mixes, and then then it was the balsamic vinegar and the thick and chocolate spread, a blueberry spread, a peach grilling sauce, to salts. I do a hot cocoa seasonally for one client. Still we do that and then we have all the bar products now, so there's only so much time. Yeah, Howco and FIG figures, what's that about? That was good. It's literally leaf figs are one of my most favorite things in the world, but you get good figs for like ten days, right, okay, and so you take the figs that have lightly blemished and you pure a them, and so you take maybe a pound of figs, four to five ounces of like an seventy eighty percent dark cocoa chocolate and a...

...half cup of sugar and you pray that all together and then you heat it until it's literally thermals, like hundred eighty five degrees, so it's safe, and you put into a jar and yeah, wow, ice cream toast toe. Is it like a like a like a spread? Yeah, like a new Teles is a very similar tuned new tell. Okay, I got the fruit in it. Yeah, that's yeah, and sounds like that was one of the first things that went into the market district, okay store. They were very supportive of that and I was always excited about it because there's another company that makes it in Croatia. Oh and about like unbannounced to you at the time? At the time I did. I didn't know, okay, and I found this as a barrier going into grocery stores and trying to sell this real because it's a beautiful pop product, is a very tasty product, but my funding game. So it's this is a disclaimer on the Croatian products as may contain stems and twigs, and I'm like, yeah, I'm going to come back take a quick break for our sponsors. This is the craft food classroom, the PODCAST, sponsored by Hindens, where with Clark Pope, and we will be back. Do you have an amazing food product that's retail ready? If so, you should check out our class on delivering the perfect pitch. It's taught by Kim Hyden from Hyden's and she heads up the category management team. She's gonna take you through the key differentiators that'll set you and your product apart, as well as to give you the four peas of a perfect pitch. It really is a great road map to get you on retail shelves. So check that out at the central dot kitchen classroom. This is Eric David bringing you the craft food classroom the podcast. We are back, back cope in the house. Whose House that how this central kitchen house or the launchbox. So we are going to this is going to be fun. We're going to taste some cocktails and we're going to hear about Clark being a musician in bars in downtown Cleveland. That's gonna be so what's the first thing we're drinking? So you know, it's kind of touch base. The end of the pandemic started up. They shut down the restaurants and grocery stores. Right, we're doing just the centials. So I took my classic cocktail syrups made here at the launch kitchen facility and made the first ready to drink, resealable spirit. Base is pouch in the United States. So this is a three hundred seventy five milliter pouch, as the equivalent of three ounces of eighty proof in a bag. And we have a Mohito, a blueberry lemonade and a whisky smash. So when we get start with let's let's start off which do a little bit of the of the Mohito. Okay, Mohito is one of my most favorite drinks. It is a plastic it is very flavorful,...

...it is cane sugar, mint rum and that is actually all that is in my product here. Well, so the MOHITO and is a beautiful drink. It's good for you and taste smells delicious. HMM. So in the bar world's a lot of work because you're gonna have to muddle your sugar cube with the mint and you're grinding that into the bottom of the glass to release the oils and then you're just adding in your white rum. So this case we're taking freshman and lime, juice and cane sugar with a white rum and that's all. It's in the bag. That the metal is very prominent, especially when you can smell it, but once you taste it it blends everything some that lime smooth. Yeah, it's really light. It is very minty. The very many forward, but it's supposed to be. What's Nice with this is you can do it run out of the pouch ready to go, or put it with ice cubes, little spring of mint and a slice of lime. You can fancy it up for your friends and family. Why the Pouch? What? What? What made you do at so the pouch was a function of necessity. So when everything's shut down and the Governor Ohio said you could do to go drinks at the bars, people were struggling to find something to put it into. So when you're going into glass, where you know that's very expensive, you're going to the cans. That's specially equipment. This pouch has got a resealable tip and so all we needed was the funnel. So literally was just buying these off the Internet and printing up labels and they were going out of the academy tavern on large pairs of buddies bar and very quickly realized how much people enjoyed this and so took eleven months to during the Pandamon to get it licensed and up. Wow. Well, it was really fun. Originally we were looking at about it eight ounce, which is a solid, good sized cocktail, and the federal government said this is a non traditional packaging. You must be three hundred and seventy five million leaders or two hundred Milli leaders. Those your only choices, and I'm like okay. So now we have what is twelve point seven ounces, three hundred seventy five. It is the equivalent of three ounces of eighty proof liquor, and you two are the first people to hear it. Awesome. The Baby Bag, who I love? The Baby Bang. Yeah, so launching in the spring of two thousand and twenty two will be the two hundred millileater pouch. We will still be doing the large pouches for retail and the two hundred milliar pouch we're going to be targeting concessions event spaces. So they're doing it's basically a one point seven six ounces of liquor per bag. I'm very flavorful. Same Ingredient, same recipe. That's all just more of a one person, one shots, and you go to the concession stand. It's going to be maybe twelve bucks and you can go back where's right now most concessions are doing the from oneous eighteen to twenty two. WHOA, because it's the onetime shot. So little different packaging. That's cool. I like that idea. Yeah, it's excited. I feel like you need to sell IV drips with this like and just plug people right in and given the thing, they can walk through.

I mean they do specially make those bags for Halloween and we've given it great thought. Yeah, yeah, that's like a grandberry line. Yeah, and just so we'd be rocking. That'd be cool. All right. What's up next? Oh Man, well, the choice. We got Whiskey smash. We should go for the Whiskey smash. Did the whiskey smash. We can use the same drink, same blast where if you've finished off. By the way, I'm getting hammered because there's no ice and this is straight to the head, warm body temperature. So a whiskey smash. So a smash by classical bartending definition is any cocktail, liquor rum vodka, whiskey, etc. That is going to be mint with a piece of fruit. So you can have a blockberry smash, Blueberry Smash, a lemon smash. That just has to be meant. And if from mint and fruit, okay, you would basically again, you would beat that down to the bottom of your glass, get the mint oils to release, mush up your fruit and you'd add your whiskey. In this case this is a young whiskey. It's not age you can see how clear it is. It's not that really rich bourbon color and we did this because once you have aged in a barrel and you get those beautiful spices and notes for Whiskey, it doesn't do well with fresh lemon. By having a young, raw whiskey, it takes that lemon juice really nicely and I find this to be almost a whiskey based MOHITO. This is delicious. Okay, it's delicious. Is Not I don't like whiskey and I love this. Thank you. This is delicious. It is man's I could drink this is dangerous. Actual yeah, it's really, really lovely and it's the hardest when a lot of people like, oh, I don't like whiskey. I don't know whiskey my go ahead and try it and then you'll get some people are like I love my whiskeys and bourbons and they're like, I don't know if I'm gonna like it because good scotch or deep bourbon drinkers not adding lemonade. Ye, are right, right. So that's where this one is so special, because it is that raw, soft whiskey goes very, very well for lemon and when you say a young whiskey, so it's just unaged, okay, right. So, like you know when things are bonded, they're going to be aged for, you know, two thirty six months. Right, Bourbon by law is aged in a new oak barrel. Right, doesn't say how long is age has to be aged. This is completely unaged. So no barrel, just no barrel, just fresh, okay, fresh whiskey. And it's got that light yellow color and that's from the lemon juice instead of having that deep oak feel to it. Is it true that it has to be aged in a barrel that came from Kentucky? NOPE, Gotcha. Know, Kentucky is the home of Bourbon, okay, but Bourbon by law in the United States is fifty one percent corn aged in a new American oak barrel at those are the only requirements. So our friends at Cleveland Whiskey here in downtown Cleveland, Yep, they have a bourbon right because they do age it all right and it is an American oak barrel and they have their own processes to get their flavor profile right. So Kentucky does well. The limestone that most of Kentucky is those aquifers. They've filtered it through that limestone...

...so that water has its own literal chemical composition to stay and it's very distinct. But Um, yeah, and but it is fun. If you go down to Louisville you can go to Cooper's town where they actually make the barrels and have a distillery and house and so they're actually you can go in and watch them make the barrels. It's really kind of cool. It's cool. So were you ever a bartender? I bartended in college. I was technically part of the kitchen staff and would fill in got an. I'm now the vice president of the United States bartender skilled the Cleveland Chapter and I do barten Dean. Yes, but I have never made a solitary living. Just behind. All right, right, right, Oh, you definitely have the personality for it. Super Cool. So so, for those of you who are drinking at Miami at attractions in the early S, that very that would have been the bar sat out to Miami University of Miami. Yuh, love and honor. That's it. All right, let's try the blueberry lemonade and then I want to hear about yours. Get hammered first and then we can let you talk about that. Okay, so we're I feel like I'm opening my own packs. I should. This is the blueberry lemonade. Now again. Each one of these pouches, gentlemen, is the equivalent of three ounces of eighty proof liquor. So it is two cocktails in a bag right now. So you're basically, if we divide this equally by three, you're drinking a shot per bag. So that's three shots per podcast. Disclaimer, you do want to make sure that you are waiting before you try phone, because good thing we ate, good thing we had lunch once was lovely. Thank you, David Nic Speke, the TATOR. Yeah, no problem, put a time stamp on this. Here we go, here we go. Yeah, all right, cheers, cheers, like the clink, clink. Now this one. Okay, it's a very thank you. So my words. I was going to comment on the optics of this. It's very pretty. It's got a nice red tent to it. Who and reminds me of the holidays, for so does remind me of the holidays. But this, this wanted to be dangerous. Okay, yeah, yeah, that is goes down like. Yeah, this goes down. I literally like a soft and better VIBA. Yeah, that's what that's. That's what that is. So this is a voma cocktail. It's very smooth and the colors great. So I do not add any coloring agents to any of my protests. Is Natural Color. This is natural color. This is what happens when you take blueberries and add fresh lemon juice. Get the hell you get that soft purple colors right, nice and and that's why I'm very proud. My Product is actually circle U, kosher certified, and you can go to any other front packages. It's like the Mohent Mohito is rum lime just meant in Kane Sugar. The blueberry is vodka, blueberries, lemon juice and cane sugar. That's my stuff right here, right this is this right here? I got a whiskey. I gotta give it up. I like it, all of this, all of it religious. I think I gotta go at the Whiskey smash too. Yeah, you, you intrague me. As an entrepreneur, though, you you...

...do a lot. You do a lot. You absolutely do a lot, I mean, and you do a lot of good too. I try, I try. I firmly believe above all else that when you're asking the community support you, you've got to go backwards and support your community. Yeah, whether that is other entrepreneurs the people that you live with. We actually do a lot of work for many, many years, about twenty all the entirety of my relationship my wife of a Mary, twenty one years. So we've been twenty two years together as a couple, working in volunteering of playhoff squared downtown. All right, that's awesome. The last several years doing a lot of work with Cleveland Food Bank. Cool. When they do their their barten, their community events and they have a bar, I go in and help organize and run the bar for them. Very cool. You got to yet right, if I want the community support me, I've just worked the community. That's true. And we see that, Eric, all the time, from from all the cities we've gone to. The people who are successful, the entrepreneur neewers and the businesses that thrive are the ones who give back, right, whether it's silently or what, they're always a part of something in some kind of philanthropic or charitable way, and that's one of the great things about kind of the community that's been created at essential kitchen is I think everybody, most everybody, has that philosophy of giving back, treating their employees correctly, understanding that, as you said, Clark, people are supporting you, I need to support them back as kind of a thank you. And, let's be face it, it's just we all need a little bit more kindness in this world. Right, yeah, we all do, and as nothing like spreading kindness with alcohol. There like. I mean, this in a good move, quite a good news. But for Fler, for clarification, it's not always about money either, right, right. You know your friend is going to be doing holiday cast roles, you know, some things for the house. Put that up on your your social media, share that, encourage that, you know, because people know you're in the food business. You know they know David David's a cook does that's wonderful meals with the food. So when he says, Hey, this chef is doing this cool thing, it gives the credit, R right, it gives credence. This why, from the beginning I've always pushed that CCLK, which was Cleveland Colony launched kitchen, in the original formulation be Fley for Cleveland food up that we branded our things. Yes, you know, our code numbers actually had CCLK as well as your product number, YEP, so that everybody knew you came out of the shared use kitchen and we built on each other's reputations. Yeah, that's that's so cool. It's just so cool to see how far people like you have come starting out in the kitchen, and I don't know, I mean what you knew, that that's been created has been phenomenal. It is, it is, and I got to give you a personal shout out too, because you know you're he's down working and we got the craft food classroom that runs from like five to seven and he comes up when it's over and we have fifteen clients or students in the class and he gets in front and he starts talking to him and they all just tune in and listen because he's the visual representation of what they're trying to be. They want to go right, and it's like wow, you took the time. And he came in and he looked like he had been working, and you know I mean,...

...and it's like he was like, don't bother me, don't say anything to me, just let me talk, and they and they shut up and listen and they all were better for it. So I got to say thank you, because thank you just that, that, just that you coming back to give them what we say, permission, permission, permission to be the next clerk. Pope. That's huge. We are actually you're down in the kitchen making the holiday batch of the cranberry lime cocktail syrup. Wait a second, hold on, time out. What a holiday batch of cranberry lime? So it's not. It's not an actual cocktail for the ouch. Okay, that's in the future, but every year I take about a hundred and twenty note the math on this. A hundred and twenty pounds of cranberries, sixteen gallons of water, wow, three gallons of lime juice and cane sugar, and that will turn into basically fourteen cases of seven hundred fifty milli liter bottles. Wow, really. So each case of my cranberry cocktail Syrup for the bars has nine and a half pounds of fresh cranberries. And that tha. That's more than ocean spray on a great cabin by a lot cannon gelatinous slop. It doesn't even have that much fran dry and it's yeah, so we came up. It's like someone's like, Oh, they got classed in that, you should go up. So I went up and you're like, Clark, you got five minutes. Yeah, like, let's go. Yeah, he killed it Um. But it was funny because two of them had already contacted me, Oh wow, in advance and had questions, and then two of them since then have reached out, because I believe that don't make my mistake right. I've made the mistake. I've paid for the mistake emotionally, mentally, monetarily. Learn from me. Yeah, that's huge. That's huge. All right, we're gonna I'm gonna pour myself a little bit more whiskey smacks. I'm going to take a break. Go ahead and try to get home tonight. This is Eric David bringing you the craft food classroom the podcast. We will be back. This is Eric David bringing you the craft food classroom the podcast. We are back. We're back with Clark and his awesome kind averages, alcohol, Alcoholic Beverages. I'm going to be dancing on a table here in a minute. Yeah, that's a good one. I already am in my mind. So where can we get these Act Clark? So very exciting. So you know I have thirty seven products in the market. So it is important to distinguish that. These are fully alcoholed cocktails, ready to drink right out of the bag. Keep them your refrigerator, put them on ice, pour them over ice, no need to freeze them, they're ready to go. And also my bloody Mary's, which are lovely. Well, they free say will freeze, but there's so much alcohol in them they don't freeze very well. So you kind of have to crunch him up and tournament the slushies. Yeah, which is fun. But I am excited to say that you can go to, I believe we're in seventeen Hinhan's right now,...

Shot Highness, and so it's very exciting. They have, of course, the Pope's bloody Mary and the traditional and bold and then a separately over in the wine and beer section, you will find displays of the popes in about yes, your bloody mary mix is always a staple for Thanksgiving morning and our household. Interesting. Yeah, very, very much. Works well for drinking and tossing with Pasta, you know, a little leftover Turkey, chopped that up, a little fresh pasta, Bloody Mary. I also use the bloody Mary in it's my tomatoes, my tomato soup base. Yep, phenomenal tomato soup, Chili, chill. I use it in a spaghetti sauces. Yeah, I'm a I'm a big fan of the very classic four ounces of Pope's bloody Mary Mix, handful of ice, two ounces vodka, hard shake, Carnis with pickle, olive and shrimp. Oh, interesting day. So I've never had anything that thick. Yeah, like like that. That's great. Yeah, yeah, it's a trip. So it's like a meal. Yeah, it is absolutely a meal. And funny you should say that the Ohiw Department of Agriculture just decided that my bloody Mary is ready to drink because it's so much juice and nutrient and it doesn't need to be considered a mixer. said it the other day about the percentage of juice. Can I say that again? Yeah, yeah, because that's I'm honesting had to get a new license. So we now producing a ready to drink product just to for a mixer and new labels coming out and so coming up in the next batch we will be in one leader bottles, so a little bit bigger bottle, and it is going to be the bold is thirty three percent juice by volume. Wow, and you know you're thinking, well, you know, what's the rest of it? With the rest of it is like the tomatoes, right, the Hallapanos and the horseradish and the black peppers, etc. And the Worcester suter Shire saw w saware such a time. We call it that'saw such a fun word. And then the traditional I kid you not, the traditionals like forty eight percentage, and I will put that up against any other bloody marryments in the country. Now, I know. Hell, yeah, yeah, and the difference there is all of the tomatoes are sourced out of Sin Dusky County through the Hurtzel Family Co op, I love, and those are also available as the defer telly tomato. Those you see. Those also hinds. Yes, you do. That's the same group, and so very proud that all my tomatoes are Ohio source and we're using real tomatoes. Were not using pastes and water, we're actually using crush tomatoes. That's awesome, man. That means a lot too. I mean in this world where people can take shortcuts all the time, you do it with whole foods, whole ingredients. Yep, wholesome products. Yeah, we're trying to make sure we represent well ourselves, our family, our community and to a good product. Well, Clark, this has been a pleasure having you on and it's also been a pleasure watching you grow and becoming friends over the years. And congratulations on your success. Congratulations on these products. Their phenomenal. I urge everyone to run out and grab them. I do too, and I do, I do and it. Like I said earlier, and I mean it. You Inspire me. Yeah, and I can speak for the class. You inspire a lot of people, ma'am. Thank you. Yeah, for sure. In stay tuned for the new flaming river a vacca cocktail available this spring at...

...your local hides. Can't wait. Awesome. So then, this is Eric David bringing you the craft food classroom, the podcast. We're out peace the thanks for joining on. The craft food classroom podcast, where we help make food business simple at every stage of growth, brought to you five central kitchen media. To learn more about what we're doing, visit us at the central dot kitchen. Please subscribe to this podcast to learn more about food entrepreneurs and their experience in the craft food business. The craft food classroom food business course teaches students exactly what they need to know to succeed in the craft food industry and avoid pitfalls and costly mistakes. You can use the code podcast twenty one at checkout for ten percent off. The craft food classroom is a comprehensive and in depth five part online, go at your own pace course that will provide everything needed to build a thriving food business. Each module includes a video presentation, workbook and quiz. To learn more, visit classroom dot thus central dot kitchen. This podcast is brought to you by Hydans, founded in one thousand nine hundred and twenty nine and Shaker Heights, Ohio, by local butcher Joe Hayden. Hydans is grown to twenty three total locations, with nineteen stores in the Cleveland area. And four in the north shore suburbs of Chicago. After years of building connection with Midwest farmers, it became a part of Hydan's nature to do business with smaller regional companies. Today, Hyans is proud to carry nearly seven hundred Midwest made non produce items that are present in all departments. For more information, go to hyanscom.

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